I was so stunned, that I had to read this article twice before I understood its true meaning. The Suffolk County District Attorney in Boston, Massachusetts brought PEACE to America. It’s the first instance that I am aware of this interview and interrogation technique, developed over 30 years ago in the UK, being taught here in the United States.

PEACE combines both legal and ethical techniques.  Previously, this forward-thinking prosecutor had experts come in to talk to his Trial and Homicide units about  False Confessions.

Reading between the lines of this article brings me to a logical conclusion. If certain methods of legal, although not always ethical interrogations  produce false confessions, this is how would he fill the void if he discouraged the use of false-confession producing techniques.

I will keep you posted on his progress.

http://www.reverejournal.com/2014/12/30/suffolk-da-conley-holds-course-in-cutting-edge-interview-techniques/#

In the same Google Alert, I then read how some of the boys n’ girls in blue in Austin, TX are not going with the flow for transparency in the interrogation process. This summer, I blogged about how then U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder sent a memorandum to all Federal LEO about recording all interrogations and serious interviews. I also blogged about the need to record all custodial interviews. Otherwise, the stuff that goes on before the final recorded event never sees the light of day in a courtroom.

http://www.news-journal.com/news/state/law-enforcement-officials-wary-of-bill-forcing-recorded-interrogations/article_1c4b0740-8607-5e25-8899-5b955e0847f0.html

Maybe it’s just that their patrol officers are camera shy. Antonio Buehler, a Stanford and West Point Grad, was acquitted after a four day trial on misdemeanor charges stemming from his filming of a street arrest in the Texas capital with his smart phone.

http://www.democracynow.org/2014/10/29/is_filming_a_police_officer_a

I try to focus on investigative interviewing technique, false witness/false confession wrongful convictions, but to have the same PD fighting against filming their finest either sitting down behind closed doors or standing on the street had me pondering why.

Lastly, in the January 4, 2015  New Haven Register article, David Cameron again writes about the need for a Conviction Integrity Unit (CIU), his number one exhibit is the argument of a False Confession case dragging  through appeals process for a man imprisoned now for over twenty-two years for a heinous crime where there is ample evidence of who the real perpetrator may be.

There are only thirteen CIUs, at my last count, throughout 3,300 counties, 50 states and the Federal Government.  To spawn the first state-wide CIU brings to my minds-eye the Herculean effort those salmon go though every year. Almost each of those units were formed by elected District Attorney and here in CT, District Attorneys are not elected. Almost each creation came about by inheriting cases from their predecessors that didn’t pass the smell test. With only a few exceptions, the CIUs are now slowly dealing with a patterns and practices of overzealous prosecutors, individual detectives or forensic units deemed in need of further scrutiny. Sadly, it seems, this process doesn’t look at the whole barrel, just the few bad apples.

http://www.nhregister.com/opinion/20150103/forum-will-2015-bring-a-new-connecticut-trial-for-richard-lapointe

In 2015, I will continue to swim upstream about these things because they matter to me. How about you? What do you think?